Traceability

What livestock traceability is and why it is important

According to Canadian Food Inspection Agency, traceability is the ability to follow an item or a group of items – be it animal, plant, food product or ingredient – from one point in the supply chain to another, either backwards or forwards.

A fully-functional traceability system is based on three pillars:

  1. Animal identification – Associating a unique animal identification number to an animal (e.g., applying an approved animal indicator to an animal);
  2. Premises identification – Assigning a unique identification number to a physical land location (i.e., legal land description or geo-referenced coordinates) by a provincial/territorial premises registry;
  3. Animal movement – Recording the change in location (i.e., from one unique premises to another unique premises) of a uniquely-identified animal at a specified time/date.

To track an animal and facilitate a fully-functional, national traceability system, every livestock premises must have a valid, premises identification (PID) number in order to report animal movement (e.g., move in, move out, sighted, imported, exported and temporary export events).

Traceability systems are important, effective tools that can be used for many things, including the protection of animal health, public health and food safety. They can help reduce response time, thereby limiting economic, environmental and social impacts of emergency situations such as disease outbreaks and environmental disasters such as floods, fires and pipeline bursts.

How the System Works

The Database

The Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) database at www.clia.livestockid.ca is a trace-back system that maintains the information associated with each unique, approved animal identification indicator/tag device.

The CLTS database allows regulated parties (i.e., livestock operators) to record information pertaining to the three pillars of traceability (i.e., animal identification, premises identification and animal movement), as well as value-assurance information (e.g., age verification).

 

The System Itself

  1. CCIA allocates unique identification numbers from the CLTS database to approved manufacturers for the manufacture of approved animal indicators used in the livestock identification program for beef cattle.
  2. Approved manufacturers visually and electronically embed each approved CCIA RFID animal indicator with a unique identification number allocated from the CLTS database.
  3. Approved CCIA RFID animal indicators for beef cattle are distributed to livestock operators through
    CCIA-authorized retailers across Canada, CCIA’s toll-free order desk at 1-877-909-2333 or online at tags.canadaid.ca. This national distribution network securely reports all tag issuance records directly to the CLTS database.
  4. Livestock operators apply an approved animal indicator to an animal prior to the animal leaving its farm of origin or the premises where it is located.
  5. Livestock operators are able to record and report livestock traceability-related data by associating reportable events with the unique identification number of an approved animal indicator that has been issued to the livestock operator’s CLTS database account and applied to an animal. Reportable data includes birth date, move in, move out, imported, exported, retired animal events.
  6. Livestock operators and terminal sites must maintain the unique identification number for each animal to the point of export or carcass inspection for traceability purposes.
  7. The CLTS database maintains all historical data that has been associated with the unique identification number for each approved animal indicator. This data may be accessed by the CLTS account holder as needed, or authorized CFIA personnel in an emergency situation only.
Regulated Parties

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency is the responsible administrator for beef and dairy cattle, bison, sheep, goats and cervid.

Regulated parties include:

Learn more about the general requirements for livestock identification and traceability from Canadian Food Inspection Agency

 

Current and Proposed Regulations

Current Regulations

Canadian Food Inspection Agency outlines the requirements for the identification of cattle, bison and sheep as defined in the Health of Animals Regulations.

Proposed Regulations

Last update June 27, 2017

Canadian Food Inspection Agency is continuing its review of Phase II comments from the regulatory amendment industry-consultation process to draft animal movement requirements, which will be published in Part I of the Canada Gazette in early 2018 followed by a third consultation with industry and comment period. After which, CFIA will review industry’s comments and publish the finalized regulations in Part II of the Canada Gazette, which is when proposed regulations would come into force.

CFIA’s regulatory amendments will be implemented with a phased-in approach. Currently, CFIA and industry are considering a two-phased proposal for regulatory amendment.

PROPOSED Farms, feedlots, fairs, exhibits, rodeos, veterinary clinics, artificial insemination centres, test stations Auctions, assembly yards and buying stations Terminal sites
Phase I

when regulations come into force:

Reporting receipt of individual animals via *passive reading with source site PID
and time of loading. Reporting departure of individual animals to community pasture or crown grazing land with destination site PID and time of loading
Reporting receipt
of animals as a **group
with source site PID
and time of loading
Reporting receipt
of individual animals
– all tags
with source site PID
and time of loading
Phase II

two years after regulations come into force:

Reporting receipt of individual animals via *passive reading with source site PID
and time of loading. Reporting departure of individual animals to community pasture or crown grazing land with destination site PID and time of loading
Reporting receipt
of animals as a **group
with source site PID
and time of loading
Reporting receipt
of individual animals
– all tags
with source site PID
and time of loading
*PASSIVE READING: CFIA will consider any amount of data captured to be acceptable if reader equipment is installed, powered on and properly maintained.

**GROUP REPORTING: The use of an approved movement document that contains the required data and accompanies the livestock, or is sent in an electronic format to the livestock’s destination site. The receiver will be required to report the movement data to the CLTS database.

 

SPECIAL NOTE: Industry must be proactive within the first three years of proposed regulations coming into force. CFIA will undertake a formal evaluation three years after the proposed regulations come into force to determine whether additional measures are necessary. If traceability system performance criteria fail to be met, additional measures may be necessary – including further regulatory amendment to incorporate individual animal reporting at all sites

How industry's early adopters can prepare

Producers

  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Begin to complete a movement document and ensure it accompanies livestock leaving your premises or send a copy to the destination premises on a voluntary basis.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with source site PID and time of loading on a voluntary basis.
  • Begin to report departure (move out) of animals into community pasture or crown grazing land on a voluntary basis.
  • Explore the CLTS Resource Centre’s user manual, templates and video tutorials or contact us directly for complimentary, one-on-one training and technical support.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for livestock producers
Auction Marts and Assembly Yards
  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Display/make valid PID available for industry/public reference
  • Collect movement documents for all livestock deliveries
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with source site PID and time of loading (i.e., movement document data) on a voluntary basis.
  • Explore the CLTS Resource Centre’s user manual, templates and video tutorials or contact us directly for complimentary, one-on-one training and technical support.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Order Buyers and Buying Stations
  • Complete a movement document for all livestock purchased at an auction OR livestock leaving the premises
    (i.e., identify where the livestock was purchased by recording the source site’s PID on the movement document) The receiver will be responsible to report the arrival/receipt (move in) of livestock.
  • Ensure the movement document accompanies the departing livestock or is forwarded to the next destination/premises. The buyer will be responsible to complete the movement document.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Feedlots
  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Collect movement documents for all livestock deliveries
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with the source site’s PID and time of loading on a voluntary basis.
  • Complete a movement document for all livestock purchased at an auction OR livestock leaving the premises
    (i.e., identify where the livestock was purchased by recording the source site’s PID on the movement document) The receiver will be responsible to report the arrival/receipt (move in) of livestock.
  • Ensure the movement document accompanies the departing livestock or is forwarded to the next destination/premises.
  • Begin to report departure (move out) of animals into community pasture or crown grazing land, on a voluntary basis.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Transporters and Conveyances
  • Ensure the shipper presents the movement document for the livestock to be transported
  • Complete the Transporters’ section of the movement document, including the source site’s PID and time of loading
  • Deliver the movement document to the receiver at the final destination
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for livestock carriers
Terminal Sites
The Cattle Implementation Plan

The Cattle Implementation Plan

The Cattle Implementation Plan (CIP) is industry’s roadmap to identify the targets, steps and issues in implementing a sustainable, effective and efficient cattle traceability system for Canada.

All sectors of industry and governments developed the CIP document through a collaborative process at the National Cattle Traceability Summit in August 2011, where important milestones were attained and consensus was reached to move ahead in the resolution of movement recording and overcoming premises identification issues in Canada.

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency leads the Cattle Implementation Plan Committee, which is an external committee comprised of industry and governments working together to identify the targets, steps and issues in implementing traceability within the cattle industry. The CIP Committee includes:

  • Alberta Beef Producers
  • Alberta Cattle Feeders Association
  • Alberta Agriculture and Forestry
  • Beef Farmers of Ontario
  • Canadian Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Livestock Dealer’s Association
  • Canadian Veterinary Medical Association
  • Canadian Veal Association
  • Dairy Farmers of Canada
  • Livestock Identification Services
  • Livestock Markets of Canada
  • Livestock Services of Saskatchewan
  • Manitoba Beef Producers
  • National Cattle Feeders Association
  • Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
  • Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association
  • Nineteen industry associations support the CIP document by resolution, including:
  • Alberta Auction Markets Association
  • Alberta Livestock Dealers and Order Buyers Association
  • Alberta Beef Producers
  • Beef Farmers of Ontario
  • British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Beef Breeds Council
  • Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
  • Canadian Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Livestock Dealer’s Association
  • Canadian Meat Council
  • Canadian Trucking Alliance
  • Dairy Farmers of Canada
  • Les producteurs de bovins du Québec
  • Livestock Markets Association of Canada
  • Manitoba Livestock Markets Association
  • Manitoba Beef Producers
  • Maritime Beef Council
  • National Cattle Feeders Association
  • Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association

How industry’s early adopters can prepare

Producers
  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Begin to complete a movement document and ensure it accompanies livestock leaving your premises or send a copy to the destination premises on a voluntary basis.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with source site PID and time of loading on a voluntary basis.
  • Begin to report departure (move out) of animals into community pasture or crown grazing land on a voluntary basis.
  • Explore the CLTS Resource Centre’s user manual, templates and video tutorials or contact us directly for complimentary, one-on-one training and technical support.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for livestock producers

 

Auction Marts and Assembly Yards

 

  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Display/make valid PID available for industry/public reference
  • Collect movement documents for all livestock deliveries
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with source site PID and time of loading (i.e., movement document data) on a voluntary basis.
  • Explore the CLTS Resource Centre’s user manual, templates and video tutorials or contact us directly for complimentary, one-on-one training and technical support.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Order Buyers and Buying Stations
  • Complete a movement document for all livestock purchased at an auction OR livestock leaving the premises
    (i.e., identify where the livestock was purchased by recording the source site’s PID on the movement document) The receiver will be responsible to report the arrival/receipt (move in) of livestock.
  • Ensure the movement document accompanies the departing livestock or is forwarded to the next destination/premises. The buyer will be responsible to complete the movement document.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Feedlots
  • Confirm or obtain a valid premises identification number from a regional PID registry.
  • Login to Canadian Livestock Tracking System database account to ensure emergency contact information is current and a valid PID is entered. Take 10 minutes to become familiar with the account layout, operations and navigation.
  • Collect movement documents for all livestock deliveries
  • Begin to report receipt (move in) of animals with the source site’s PID and time of loading on a voluntary basis.
  • Complete a movement document for all livestock purchased at an auction OR livestock leaving the premises
    (i.e., identify where the livestock was purchased by recording the source site’s PID on the movement document) The receiver will be responsible to report the arrival/receipt (move in) of livestock.
  • Ensure the movement document accompanies the departing livestock or is forwarded to the next destination/premises.
  • Begin to report departure (move out) of animals into community pasture or crown grazing land, on a voluntary basis.
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for intermediate sites
Transporters and Conveyances
  • Ensure the shipper presents the movement document for the livestock to be transported
  • Complete the Transporters’ section of the movement document, including the source site’s PID and time of loading
  • Deliver the movement document to the receiver at the final destination
  • Learn more about Canada’s Livestock Identification and Traceability Program requirements for livestock carriers
Terminal Sites
The Cattle Implementation Plan

The Cattle Implementation Plan

The Cattle Implementation Plan (CIP) is industry’s roadmap to identify the targets, steps and issues in implementing a sustainable, effective and efficient cattle traceability system for Canada.

All sectors of industry and governments developed the CIP document through a collaborative process at the National Cattle Traceability Summit in August 2011, where important milestones were attained and consensus was reached to move ahead in the resolution of movement recording and overcoming premises identification issues in Canada.

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency leads the Cattle Implementation Plan Committee, which is an external committee comprised of industry and governments working together to identify the targets, steps and issues in implementing traceability within the cattle industry. The CIP Committee includes:

  • Alberta Beef Producers
  • Alberta Cattle Feeders Association
  • Alberta Agriculture and Forestry
  • Beef Farmers of Ontario
  • Canadian Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Livestock Dealers Association
  • Canadian Veterinary Medical Association
  • Canadian Veal Association
  • Dairy Farmers of Canada
  • Livestock Identification Services
  • Livestock Markets of Canada
  • Livestock Services of Saskatchewan
  • Manitoba Beef Producers
  • National Cattle Feeders Association
  • Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
  • Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association
  • Nineteen industry associations support the CIP document by resolution, including:
  • Alberta Auction Markets Association
  • Alberta Livestock Dealers and Order Buyers Association
  • Alberta Beef Producers
  • Beef Farmers of Ontario
  • British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Beef Breeds Council
  • Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
  • Canadian Cattlemen’s Association
  • Canadian Livestock Dealer’s Association
  • Canadian Meat Council
  • Canadian Trucking Alliance
  • Dairy Farmers of Canada
  • Les producteurs de bovins du Québec
  • Livestock Markets Association of Canada
  • Manitoba Livestock Markets Association
  • Manitoba Beef Producers
  • Maritime Beef Council
  • National Cattle Feeders Association
  • Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association